Understanding the Materials Used in Cut-Resistant Gloves

It’s no secret that protective gloves are necessary when working with sharp tools or machinery, but do you know which material is best suited for the equipment you work with?

Cut-resistant gloves are purposely made with different synthetic materials to provide the optimum level of protection for the job. There are four common types of materials used in cut-resistant glove designs and it’s important to know the nature of each in order to choose the best glove for you.

We’ve explored the science behind these materials, outlined all the features and recommended a pair of gloves in each category to help you get informed and select the right pair of gloves for the task at hand.

DuPontTM Kevlar®

DuPont Kevlar is an aramid fiber that is impressively lightweight, durable and strong. Kevlar fiber has a high tensile strength-to-weight ratio—the material is five times stronger than steel (and was originally used as a replacement for steel in racing tires), yet is light and pliable enough to apply to wearable goods.

Features

Cut-Resistant-Materials

  • Cut resistant
  • Strong (5x stronger than steel on an equal weight basis)
  • Flame resistant (will not melt)
  • Lightweight & comfortable
  • Durable (extended wear times and product life)
  • Food safe (complies with FDA regulations for direct food contact)
  • Launderable (do not use bleach)
  • Available in a wide range of styles

Recommended Gloves

9389PV MEMPHIS TM KS-4 TM KEVLAR® -STEEL

Dyneema®

Dyneema Diamond Technology is an ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene that is a progression from the original Dyneema. Much like Kevlar, Dyneema is a lightweight and natural-feeling fiber, but with a much higher tensile strength-to-weight ratio. Dyneema is trademarked as “the world’s strongest fiber” and is light enough to float on water.

Features

Cut-Resistant-Materials

  • Cut resistant
  • Strong (15 times stronger than steel on an equal weight basis)
  • Excellent abrasion
  • Cool to the touch
  • Soft & flexible
  • Durable (extended wear times and product life)
  • Breathable (inherently dissipates body heat)
  • Washable (do not use bleach)

Recommended Gloves

9672DT MEMPHIS TM DIAMOND TECH 3

AlycoreTM

Alycore is one of the most effective materials available for resistance to cuts, tears and punctures. Layer-based technology combines multiple layers of metal mesh Alycore to yield higher resistance against the Cut Protection Performance Test (CPPT). Alycore material offers reliable protection and dexterity with a sense of touch due to its high degree of flexibility.

Features

FeaturesCut-Resistant-Materials

  • Cut resistant
  • Strong (exceeds ANSI/ISEA and CE cut level 5 test rating)
  • Solid (meets ASTM F2878-10 standard for resistance to hypodermic needle puncture)
  • Lightweight & flexible
  • Launderable (machine wash, line dry)
  • Available in palm-only or 360-degree coverage designs

Recommended Gloves

HV100A FORCEFLEXTM Alycore TM

Steelcore II®

Steelcore II combines dual strands of stainless steel, which are wrapped with a soft knit yarn in glove designs. Steelcore material provides a comfortable fit, incredible dexterity and a substantial level of protection.

Features

FeaturesCut-Resistant-Materials

  • Cut resistant
  • Soft & flexible
  • Food safe (complies with FDA regulations for direct food contact)
  • Launderable (machine wash, line dry)
  • Available with reinforced PVC coating
  • Available in reversible patterns and varying lengths

Recommended Gloves

9381 STEELCORE® II – 7-Gauge
Cut-Resistant-MaterialsBy now, you’ve hopefully identified the gloves that are best suited for the equipment you work with. To find the perfect pair of gloves, check out our wide selection of cut-resistant gloves in the U.S. Standard Products Safety Catalog. As always, stay tuned to our blog for more workplace safety tips, and don’t forget to follow us on social media!

Google+ | LinkedIn | Twitter | Instagram | Facebook

10 Essential Roofing Safety Tips

Winter has come and gone, and many professional roofers and homeowners are taking to the rooftops to inspect and repair any seasonal damage caused by the ice and cold.

Even the simplest repairs can be hazardous without proper precautions. Whether you’re a professional making a major roof replacement or just a DIY homeowner trying to make minor repairs, here are 10 roofing safety tips that everyone should consider when working on a roof.

10 Rules For Roofing Safety

1. Never Work On A Roof Alone

roofing-safety-tips
If an accident was ever to happen while working on a roof, there needs to be someone to help. For that reason, we always suggest the “buddy system” when working on a rooftop, and it’s important that there are at least two people keeping an eye on one another.

2. Wear High-Visibility Clothing or Vests

Especially for commercial roofing sites where multiple types of construction may be happening at once, it’s important to wear high-visibility clothing for safety.

U.S. Standard Products offers a range of quality high-visibility vests and clothing ideal for roofing projects. Between the choice of color, material, coverage, weather protection and more, browse our catalog to find high-quality, cost-effective roofing vests and clothing for your team.

3. Wear Shoes or Boots With a Strong Grip

Always wear shoes or boots with great traction to prevent slips or falls, especially when working on roofs with a steep pitch,. Soft-soled footwear provides excellent grip on most roofing materials, though the boots also need to be durable as they will take quite a bit of abuse over time. The constant stress from shingles or tar can quickly put some wear and tear into even the sturdiest of boots.

4. Clean Up As You Go

One of the most important roofing safety tips is to keep the work site clear of any debris or loose objects. Remove any shingles, fasteners, nails and tools from walkways or other areas with foot traffic.

5. Be Cautious When Using Ladders

roofing-safety-tips
Falls from portable ladders are a serious threat and are a leading cause of occupational injuries. To help prevent accidents, OSHA prepared an extensive guide on portable ladder safety.

Some of the most important tips from OSHA include using ladders on stable, level surfaces, and maintaining at least three points of contact (two feet and a hand or two hands and a foot) when climbing or descending on a ladder. Additionally, it’s important to exercise extra caution when near the top of the ladder, and avoid stepping on the top rung altogether.

6. Always Use Safety Glasses and Hardhats

To avoid injury from falling debris, or in the case of a fall, hardhats are always recommended when working on a roof. Safety glasses are also highly recommended to prevent any eye injuries from debris, especially during removal of shingles or the roof membrane.

If you’re in need of high-quality safety glasses or hardhats for your team that are ideal for roofing projects, check out the expansive selection in our catalog.

7. Exert Caution Around Power Lines

Especially for residential roofing sites, electrical lines can become quite an obstacle during roofing projects. Prior to climbing onto a roof, it’s important to scout for any electrical lines that may impede or approach the area you need to work in.

8. Be Careful When Transporting Materials

One of the most difficult tasks when roofing is transporting materials. Whether you’re transporting materials up a ladder or across a steep rooftop, do not carry more materials than you’re comfortable with, and be patient rather than trying to haul an excessive amount of weight.

9. Avoid Working On Roofs When It’s Wet

Roofing materials like asphalt, PVC, TPO and EPDM can be quite slippery when wet, so it’s often advised to avoid working on roofs during rainstorms. If time requirements demand otherwise, we recommend that every worker has a safety harness and takes extra precaution when navigating around the roof.

10. Be Aware of the Weather

Be sure to check the weather report prior to working on a roof to avoid being taken by surprise by an unexpected thunderstorm. It’s important to check the chance of precipitation and avoid strong gusts of wind by checking the wind speed as well.
roofing-safety-tips
Whether you’re working on a residential or commercial site, these roofing safety tips can protect you from common rooftop hazards and prevent you and your team from experiencing any major injuries.

If you’re in need of high-quality roofing hardhats, safety glasses, vests, clothing or gloves that can stand up to even the most rigorous roofing jobs, U.S. Standard Products can help. Browse our product catalog here, or give us a call at 844-877-1700.