PPE for Lab Professionals

In a laboratory, an ounce of prevention really is worth a pound of cure. Taking steps to prevent exposure to hazards comes in many forms; establishing a culture of safety, administering regular inspections, and wearing protective gear, just to name a few. Personal protective equipment (PPE) comes in many different forms and varieties; knowing what equipment to wear and when to wear it is half the battle to keeping everyone in a workplace safe.

As part of a laboratory’s staff, you know that many of the chemicals and substances worked with in a lab are dangerous to handle. Accidental exposure to chemical solutions, biological agents, or other contaminated substances can cause extreme and permanent damage. Of course, taking precautionary steps such as working under a ventilation hood is a good start, but to increase lab safety, workers will also need to wear quality PPE.

Diving into Lab Safety Head-First

Starting at the top, protecting the eyes and face is a simple way to greatly increase safety in your lab. Not only do those working in the lab need protection from splash hazards, they need to increase their defenses against harmful fumes that can irritate and burn the eyes and other soft tissues. Properly using safety eyewear and face shields can significantly decrease these risks.

 Key Considerations
  • Anti-fog coating, or ventilated frames
  • Goggles that seal around the eyes
  • Compatibility with respirators
  • Compatibility with/prescription lens options
  • Heat-reflective face shield window
  • Removable or lift-front face shield design
 Recommended Gear

Photo of Verdict Goggles

2400 Verdict® Goggle

Getting a Grip on Safety with Gloves

Wearing gloves reduces the risk of contact with substances that you may not even know are there. Whether you’re pouring, mixing, or just cleaning up, gloves are an important piece of armor against accidental chemical contact. There are many qualities to think about when choosing the right gloves for the task at hand.

 Key Considerations
  • Reusability
  • Thickness or puncture resistance
  • Durability
  • Resistance to hazardous chemicals and substances
  • Coating
  • Extended or incidental contact coverage
Recommended Gear

Photo of NitriMed Glove
6012 NitriMed TM Gloves

Dress for the Job

While wearing a hazmat suit should be more of the exception than the rule, being covered from head to toe in protective garments is still a good idea. Of course, clothing that is loose or provides inadequate coverage is never safe. Most, if not all, scientific labs will require hemlines below the knee, sleeves that come to the wrist, and closed-toe footwear. Some labs also require the use of shoe covers to prevent the spread of chemicals from work area to work area.

Key Considerations
  • Intensity of splash hazards
  • Resistance to chemicals and hazardous substances
  • Flame resistance
  • Tight cuffs around wrists and ankles
  • Ease of removability in case of contamination
Recommended Gear

Photo of Coveralls
12WPC Coveralls

PRO3 = PROfessional PROtection PROviders

US Standard Products has a wide selection of top quality protective equipment that provides safer and smarter protection in the lab. Start exploring your options by downloading our free catalog or calling 1-844-877-1700 today.

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When to Replace Safety Equipment

There might be more than calendars that need to be replaced in your workplace this January. As an industrial workplace employer, the safety of your workforce falls to you. Personal protective equipment (PPE) is considered the last line of defense for workplace safety. No matter the industry, knowing when to replace safety equipment minimizes failure of worn-out devices and resulting injuries. Here are some ways to know if it’s time to discard the old PPE and bring in some new gear.

Fall Arrest Systems

The number one workplace hazard is fall protection, so it should be at the top of your list when looking at what safety equipment needs replacing. The most important time to inspect a personal fall protection system is after it has been part of a fall event. OSHA guidelines state that these systems should be, “immediately removed from service and shall not be used again for employee protection unless inspected and determined by a competent person to be undamaged and suitable for reuse.”

OSHA-certified inspectors should inspect fall arrest systems yearly. Often, the equipment will have a suggested inspection date instead of an expiration date, as it is no longer required for manufacturers to incorporate one on the label. Any system that fails inspection, “must be withdrawn from service immediately, and should be tagged or marked as unusable, or destroyed,” per OSHA regulations.

Hard Hats

Without a mandated lifespan from OSHA or ANSI, it can be difficult to know when hard hats need replacing. Obviously, if there is visible damage on the exterior or interior, the hard hat needs to be removed from use. Many manufacturers recommend replacing hard hats every five years, regardless of outward appearance, and the interior suspension every 12 months.

A hard hat’s usability also depends on what sort of environment the user is working in. Extreme environments with elements such as increased heat, exposure to chemicals, or sunlight reduce the lifespan of hard hats, making them suitable for only approximately two years before needing replacement.

Shoe Safety

There is one piece of equipment that employees are almost sure to wear home: their shoes or boots. As an employer, the fact that work shoes are worn off-site makes it difficult to ensure that each worker’s footwear is up to snuff. So how do you make sure that what’s being worn complies OSHA and ANSI’s standards?

Regular shoe and boot inspections are a good start. Educating your employees on proper boot maintenance, care, and disposal is another way of ensuring proper protection. Some companies go as far as instituting shoe subsidy programs to encourage workers to replace footwear regularly. Since employees are sometimes responsible for providing their own safety gear, like boots, these subsidy programs ease or erase any potential financial burdens on workers that are associated with having new, appropriate shoes on hand.

Safety Gloves

Different jobs demand different kinds of protection—and that especially applies to hand protection. Once your employees have the right gloves for the job, you’ll also need to ensure that the gloves are in working order before each use.

Start by checking for tears, cuts, holes, or other defects before and after each task. Since gloves can get caught on tools and equipment easily, loose-fitting gloves and gloves with hanging strings should not be worn. Before starting any job, hands and gloves should be clean and dry, and for gloves that may have been contaminated, follow proper disposal procedures. Always keep extra gloves handy for when used ones need replacing.

Protection Provided by US Standard Products

Fully functional safety equipment is the key to keeping your workers well protected. US Standard Products, a nation-wide provider of quality operational and safety products, has the personal protection equipment that you need to keep your employees safe. Call 1-844-877-1700 today to learn how we can help equip your team with the gear necessary to meet OSHA standards.

Keep up with the latest industrial workplace trends by following US Standard Products on social media.

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Food Safety at Holiday Parties

After you’ve finished decorating the office, you’re ready for the event of the year: the holiday party. This year-end celebration brings the team together for a fun morale boost full of festive drinks, treats, and cuisine. There are a number of ways you can handle the food aspect of your holiday party each with their own set of pros and cons. We’ve listed below some the considerations for a few of your options, as well as the safety precautions that will need to be addressed.

Catering

Probably the quickest and easiest option, hiring a caterer takes away a lot of the stress of party preparation.

But how can you be sure you’re hiring a caterer that will use food handling best practices? Reading reviews and asking for referrals are a great way to make sure that your caterer has a history of providing their services safely before you ever meet them. You can also check to see if they are licensed at local and state levels, which helps to ensure that they are certified in food safety and if they have any past violations. If your caterer ever becomes unresponsive, doesn’t have a clear cancellation process, or neglects to provide tastings, just be aware that you are taking a shot in the dark as to what you can expect from them on the big day.

You may also want to walk through the venue with them to make sure they have everything that they need. An experienced chef and staff will know better than anyone what to do to pull off the perfect party menu.

Pre-Prepared

To be a little more hands-on, you could always choose to pick up pre-prepared appetizers from the local grocery store. Check that your selections are sealed and fresh. Be sure to keep hot things hot and cold things cold as you transport, serve, and store food to decrease the risk of bacterial growth. Before you set out your spread, wash your hands. Wearing food handling gloves is another way to prevent the spread of germs. If you decide to forego paper products, wash all dishes, cups, and utensils with hot and soapy water to get them squeaky clean for the party.

On-Site Cooking

Even though your co-workers may feel like a second family to you, the way you prepare food should be held to a different standard than how you might do so at home. On top of everything that was mentioned for a pre-prepared party, if you’re cooking on-site, you’ll want to clean your cooking area. Using paper towels and green cleaning products help to keep your cooking and eating areas clean while using fewer toxic chemicals. Make sure that these areas are completely dry before you start to cook or put any food items on them.

In this scenario, food-handling gloves should be worn not just for serving the food, but throughout the entire meal-making process. This includes changing your gloves at least once between the preparation and serving phases. You should change your food-handling gloves as frequently as necessary to avoid cross-contamination.

Microwaves can be used to cook food, just be sure that it’s heated evenly by stirring and rotating it often. Make sure that all food reaches a safe internal temperature with a cooking thermometer before serving it. There is no “close enough” in food safety.

Off-Site Cooking

Entering into an unfamiliar space makes it all the more important to follow safe food handling procedures. Knowing how big of a space you have to work with allows you to be sure that the cooking area isn’t overcrowded and food is safe from cross-contamination. You’ll also need to know what equipment is provided on-site and what you’ll need to bring with you. Since you can’t be sure what sanitation state the site will be in, leave extra time for set-up including a scrub down of the cooking area. It’s better to do a little extra cleaning up front, instead of not cleaning and wishing you had.

Party Now, Party Later

In any of these situations, there might be some leftovers. Refrigerate any leftover food as soon as possible; the longer food sits out, the more likely it will grow bacteria. If perishable food like meat, eggs, or casseroles are left out at room temperature for longer than two hours, don’t save it, discard it. If you don’t send the leftovers home with your party-goers, make sure there’s enough room in the company fridge to allow air to circulate, keeping it cool and ready to reheat on Monday.

Party with US Standard Products

No matter where your party food is made, employee safety should always be a top priority. US Standard Products, a nation-wide provider of quality operational and safety products, has the food handling gloves, green cleaning products, and other food safety equipment you need to throw a safe and happy holiday party. Contact us today at 844-877-1700 to learn how we can help you prepare for the holidays and holiday parties in the safest way possible.

To stay up-to-date on the latest industrial workplace trends, follow US Standard Products on social media.

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Your Business Flooded… Now What?

In the wake of two major hurricanes, countless businesses along our country’s southern coast are faced with the aftermath—in particular, water damage. We know that when it comes to your business operations, downtime equals lost revenue, so to help businesses get back up and running ASAP, we’ve compiled some steps to take in the event of a flood or other water damage.

First things first…

1. Assess the damage, take pictures, and call your insurance agent. Before all else, you have to get a handle on what happened, and document the damage. Be aware that even if flood water appears clear, it’s possible that it’s contaminated, so always wear protective boots and gloves whenever you’re in contact with water-damaged surfaces. Once you’ve analyzed your losses and taken pictures, call your insurance company and have them send an adjuster to conduct a formal assessment and get your claim started.

2. If you’re in a disaster area, call FEMA. In the case that your location has been officially declared a “disaster area”, contact the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to access resources and possible financial assistance.

3. Call in a pro. Water damage is tricky—if it’s not cleaned up properly, it can lead to the growth of dangerous mold and compromise the integrity of your building structure. Due to these complications, a majority of organizations opt to hire a professional restoration company for flood cleanup services.

4. Dry it out. If you have standing water in your facility, set up a pump immediately to begin the process of extracting the water. Next, you’ll want to set up industrial fans and dehumidifiers to completely dry out the space. Depending on how quickly a water damage restoration team can get there, they may handle this on your behalf.

Hiring a reputable emergency restoration crew.

Your insurance company will likely provide a recommendation for an emergency restoration company, but it’s important for you to do your homework before making a hiring decision. You’ll want to ensure that the restoration company you’re considering has the proper training, certifications, and safety procedures in place—the Better Business Bureau (BBB) is a good place to qualify credentials like that. You may also consider researching reviews to get an idea of what it’s like to work with the company before you make a commitment.

Cleaning up water damage yourself.

Whether you’re trying to cut costs or simply having a hard time finding a restoration company that will meet your needs, you may choose to handle the cleanup in-house. If this is the case, be sure that you have the right safety gear on hand. When demolishing walls, floors, and more, it’s critical that you use a respirator to protect your lungs from not only dust, but also water contaminants and potential mold spores. Again, always make sure to use heavy-duty gloves when handling any water-damaged materials. Similarly, you’ll need an extensive supply of industrial strength cleaning agents that can cut through the bacteria, and kill mold at the source.

Contact US Standard Products for water damage cleanup supplies today.

US Standard Products is a nationwide provider of quality operational and safety products. Contact us today at 844-877-1700 to learn how we can best equip your business with the safety equipment and cleaning products needed for your water damage restoration efforts.

To stay up-to-date on the latest workplace safety news and trends, follow US Standard Products on social media:

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The Must List: Manufacturing Safety

Fast-moving belts, metal-crushing machinery, and scraps potentially flying every which way. In the manufacturing world, safety hazards are plentiful, but fortunately, so is the safety equipment designed to provide protection from the dangers of the job. Here, we’ve compiled a comprehensive list of all the equipment your facility should have on hand in order to keep your workers safe, and your assembly line running smoothly and efficiently.

Fit-for-Purpose Gloves – There’s no one-size-fits-all glove. You have to do a little research to figure out which types of glove properties will be most beneficial for your specific need. For example, welders, or those who work with hot metal on the line, are going to want to get their hands on—or in—a pair heat resistant gloves. If someone is working with sharp objects, they are going to need gloves made with cut resistant materials. Learn more about selecting the right gloves for the job.

Spectacular Spectacles – You never know when something on the assembly line could go awry—and that’s precisely why it’s so important to always be prepared with safety glasses. Explore the options for different colored lenses to ensure the best visibility for the specific work environment.

Ear Protection – With so many moving parts, assembly lines are LOUD. Protect employees’ short- and long-term hearing by providing ear plugs or muffs and encouraging them to wear ear protection at all times.

Steel-Toed, Non-Slip Boots – No matter how graceful you may be, no one is immune to the potential of slipping and falling. In fact, falling is the #1 hazard in the workplace, according to OSHA. But, with employees wearing the right boots, you can help to eliminate that risk. And, with steel toes, you can be sure to protect feet from harm, should something heavy or sharp be dropped.

Bonus Tip: Repetitive Motion Stretch – Working on the line is hard work. It requires undivided focus, impeccable attention to detail, and a plethora of repetitive tasks. Keep your workers at the top of their game by providing guidance and opportunities for repetitive motion stretching. Here’s a great resource for eliminating physical stress often caused by assembly line work.

Shutting down the line due to an injury simply isn’t worth it. And at the end of the day, the safety of your employees is what matters most. With US Standard Products as your safety equipment partner, you can ensure that safety remains your top priority, and reap the benefits as they trickle down to your bottom line.

About US Standard Products

At US Standard Products’ core, we believe in keeping workers across all industries safe from the dangers of the job, and do so by providing the highest quality operational and safety products. To stay up-to-date on the latest workplace safety news and trends, follow US Standard Products on social media:

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Cold Weather Gear Guide for Outdoor Workers

Everyone always complains about the cold in the winter, but did you know that frigid weather is actually more deadly than heat? A report by the National Center for Health Statistics reveals that winter cold kills twice as many Americans than summer heat. Each year, approximately 2,000 people die due to weather-related causes. Of that population, 63% of deaths are caused by exposure to cold and/or hypothermia, while only 31% are attributed to heat-related exposure such as heat or sun stroke.

That said, if your job requires you to work outside in the winter months, it’s even more critical for you to be prepared with the proper gear to keep you safe—not only from the dangers of the job—but also from the dangers of the cold. Here, we’ve compiled some of our top wardrobe tips to keep you safe and warm as you work outdoors this winter.

1. Dress in Layers

One of the worst things you can do when working outside in the cold is break a sweat. Once your clothes trap that moisture, there’s no drying out while you’re on the job—if and when you do cool back down, that moisture will feel mighty frigid.

The trick to avoid a freezing cold sweat? Dress in layers. That way, once you amp up your activity level, you can simply take off a layer to prevent getting over heated.

2. Pick Smart Materials

As you layer on your winter clothes, pay close attention to the materials of the fabrics and the order in which you put them on. The layer closest to the skin should be made of fabric that’s effective at wicking away moisture. Popular options include synthetic fabrics, merino wool, or bamboo.

Next, you’ll want to insulate. Choose materials such as wool, goose down, or fleece to keep warm. Last, you’ll want to protect yourself from the elements with a shell-like jacket—ideally, something that’s both waterproof and breathable.

3. Wear the Right Gloves for the Job

You probably already know that given your profession, there are specific features you should look for in gloves. Manual labor and civic maintenance professionals should be on the lookout for cut protection, impact protection, and multi-purpose gloves, while knit gloves are generally sufficient for landscapers. No matter your job, if you’re working outdoors in the winter, you should most definitely be wearing some sort of gloves, if not to protect your hands from your work, to protect them from the cold-related ailments such as frostbite.

4. Be Seen

It’s important to make yourself visible during all seasons, but wearing reflective gear is especially critical in the winter months, as the hours of daylight are shortened. Since it’s likely you’ll be working in the dark, consider investing in reflective gear with electronic light-up features. Flip them on to be sure you’re seen at all times.

U.S. Standard Products is an industrial supplies distributor based in New Jersey, providing operational and safety necessities ranging from ice melt to work gloves, and so much more. To stay up-to-date on the latest workplace safety news and trends, follow U.S. Standard Products on social media:

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Stay Safe with this Checklist for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

To reduce workplace accidents and shield workers from potential hazards, it’s important to have a thorough plan for equipping workers with personal protective equipment (PPE).

Without protective equipment plan, employees are at risk of injury and employers could be subject to fines or penalties. OSHA stipulates that employers must pay for personal protective equipment for employees with the exception of prescription safety glasses, safety-toe protective footwear and other equipment or clothing that is personal or worn outside of the job.

To help determine which protective gear is necessary for the job, we’ve prepared a checklist of commonly required personal protective equipment below.

Eye Protection

When thinking about eye protection, it’s important to consider any occupational risk to the eyes or face. Common hazards include dust, liquid or chemical splashes, abrasive particles, sparks or molten metals, and it’s also important to consider comfort and the visibility requirements of the job.

In any situation that involves the hazards above, workers should, at a minimum, have a trustworthy pair of safety glasses, while some jobs may require full face shields or welding helmets. In many instances, certain types and colors of safety glasses can help improve visibility and job performance, so it’s important to consider that as well.

Head & Face Protection

In addition to the eyes, head and face protection is one of the most important areas to consider to prevent significant injuries at the workplace. Generally, a safety helmet is essential in environments where a worker could be struck on the head by a falling or fixed object, if a worker could potentially fall or if they could come into contact with an electrical hazard.

Hearing Protection

Each year, roughly 30 million workers in the U.S. are exposed to hazardous noise levels in the workplace. It’s estimated that about 125,000 workers suffer significant or permanent hearing loss each year while on the job. With these statistics in mind, employers are required to provide hearing protection to workers who are exposed to volume levels at or above 85 decibels for at least eight hours per day. However, even if workplace noises don’t reach 85 decibels, it’s still highly advised to provide hearing protection for workers.

Recommended hearing protection can vary by industry, though we previously outlined some of the best options for hearing protection in various work environments.

Hand Protection

In many professions, hand protection is absolutely essential when working with dangerous machinery or equipment or handling harmful substances or materials. However, there really is no one-size-fits-all glove for protecting the hands, so it’s important to identify the material and type of glove that works best for your industry.

Lucky for you, we’ve previously prepared guides on finding the right gloves for the job. You can find them listed below:

Foot Protection

Finding proper foot protection is essential, though between the protection offered, the thickness of the material, and the type of sole, it’s important to make the right choice based on your industry and work environment. All workers in a laboratory, factory, workshop, construction or outdoor work environments should have enclosed footwear.

In workplaces with chemicals or harmful substances, all footwear should be resistant to hazardous substances. In workshops, construction sites or factory settings, boots with steel caps or increased protection are recommended. 

Skin Protection

Employers aren’t typically required to provide most methods of skin protection (long-sleeve shirts, pants, sunscreen, etc.), though it is still a very important area to consider. Especially in outdoor environments, workplaces with exposure to flames or electricity or environments with hazardous substances and chemicals, employees should have adequate skin protection to ensure they aren’t exposed to potential harm.

To protect your employees from common workplace injuries and accidents, consider all of the areas of protection above and verify that the equipment you are providing is adequate. If you’re in need of safety equipment to protect your team, check out the U.S. Standard Products catalog. We offer a wide range of cost-effective, protective safety gear to help minimize workplace accidents and injuries.

For the latest safety tips, stay tuned to the U.S. Standard Products blog, or follow us on social media:

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Finding the Right Gloves for the Job: Drivers, Welders and Landscaping Professionals

Whether you spend your profession behind the wheel, in the metal shop or in the dirt, you require quality gloves that can keep your hands in working condition. There are different types of gloves for different types of jobs to give you the balance flexibility and protection you need to work efficiently and safely. We’ve outlined which features to look for when shopping.

Gloves for Drivers

Driving gloves provide drivers in the transportation industry with better grip of the steering wheel, with the ultimate goal of improving control of the vehicle and safety. There is a wide range of glove types available that are designed to enhance hand tactility while driving. Often, it’s the driver’s personal preference that helps them decide which type of glove is best suited for them.

Most commonly, leather is the preferred material for driving gloves, as it provides a soft, pliable feel, with pores and grain to improve gripping capabilities. Popular types of leather for driving gloves include cow, pig, goat and deer leather. Synthetic leather is also available.

Another important feature to consider when selecting driving gloves is the construction of thumb. A keystone thumb, the most ergonomic design, is sewn separately onto the palm area for maximum flexibility. A wing thumb is angled without a seam to increase durability and comfortability. The straight thumb is the most traditional design, which places the thumb perpendicular to the wrist.

Welding Gloves

Different types of welding require different types of gloves for maximum hand and wrist protection. Professionals who are involved with stick welding, for example, should consider the thickest material glove to protect from the high level of spatter. They might also consider a glove that features aluminum reinforcement on the back of the thumb to help deflect radiant heat. MIG/TIG welders might consider a lighter-duty welding glove.

Welding gloves in general are constructed of leather and feature a lining such as a foam, wool, fleece, cotton or Kevlar® for added heat protection. Welders should always wear flame-resistant gloves that feature cuffs to protect their wrists from potential spatter.

Knits for Landscapers

Landscapers rely on their hands for everything they do—it’s critical to keep them safe on the job. Knit gloves are an ideal product to provide landscapers breathable, flexible and grippable hand protection.

String knits are a popular cotton/polyester blend glove used in the landscaping profession. They’re breathable and comfortable, and are available in different gauges for varying levels of protection. Cotton knits are another great option for lighter-duty protection and can include features such as dots and coating for enhanced gripping and heat resistant lining for added safety.

Gunn pattern gloves, which feature a seamless back and a single “gunn” seam at the base of the middle finger, are a very comfortable option for landscapers. They can feature materials such as a leather and Kevlar® and often include rubberization and cuffs for enhanced safety. Gunn cut gloves are also available with insulation.

Finding the Perfect Fit

Start by measuring the circumference of your dominant hand by pulling a body measuring tape around your palm, just above your thumb. Measure three times to make sure you have the correct calculation before you select your size.

Men’s sizing:

  • 7 in. (XS)
  • 5-8 in. (S)
  • 5-9 in. (M)
  • 5-10 in. (L)
  • 5-11 in. (XL)
  • 11+ in. (XXL)

Women’s sizing:

  • 6 in. (XS)
  • 5 in. (S)
  • 7 in. (M)
  • 5 in. (L)
  • 8 in. (XL)
  • 8+ in. (XXL)

If your gloves have adjustable wrist bands, make sure you pull them snug enough to prevent any material or debris from getting in, but loose enough that you don’t cut off any circulation. If you can force one pinky finger between your wrist and the band, you’re good to go.

US Standard Products has a wide selection of top quality gloves that provide safer and smarter protection for Manual Labor and Civic Maintenance Professionals. Visit our website and download our free catalogue to start exploring your options. See all the other ways US Standard Products is making your world a better place by visiting us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

 

Finding the Right Gloves for the Job: Manual Labor and Civic Maintenance Professionals

When it comes to dirty work, not all work gloves are created equal. Depending on what type of job you have within the manual labor or civic maintenance field, you’ll need top quality gloves with special features and materials that offer the appropriate level of protection. We’ve outlined which gloves perform best in which roles and have a few tips on how to find the right style and the right fit.

Cut Protection Gloves

Cut protection gloves are designed to provide protection from excessive abrasion and exposure to sharp objects. These types of protective gloves are categorized by a Cut Protection Performance Test (CPPT) and provide reinforced palm and 360-degree protection. The CPPT levels range from 0-5, but most people select gloves with level 2 or 3. CPPT Level 2 gloves are ideal for professionals in construction, auto repair, landscaping, power tools, assembly, and equipment handling. CPPT Level 3 gloves are ideal for professionals in rigging, pipefitting, oil field maintenance, heavy construction, demolition, manufacturing, mining and fabrication.

Leading material technologies for cut protection include Kevlar® and Dyneema®. Kevlar® is a synthetic aramid fiber that provides a comfortable strength to weight ratio and is five times stronger than steel. Dyneema® is a made from ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and is 15 times stronger than steel. Alycoreis one of the most cut and puncture resistant materials out there and also offers a high level of flexibility.

Impact Protection Gloves

Impact protection gloves are designed to provide protection from excessive vibrations and stress to the hands. The glove structure focuses on reinforcing protection on the knuckles, the back of the hand and the fingertips. These types of protective gloves are ideal for professionals in construction, heavy equipment operation and metal fabricating.

There are a variety of modern materials found in impact protection glove designs. Zoombang® technology uses a unique energy-dissipating polymer that stiffens in proportion to the energy applied. Clarino® synthetic leather provides the breathability of genuine leather but is lighter and three times stronger.

Multi-Purpose Gloves

Multi-purpose gloves are designed to provide protection from environmental factors, grip, dexterity, and often, high-visibility. These types of protective gloves come in a wide variety and are ideal for professionals in emergency response, law enforcement, lawn and tree services, road construction, railroad, airport, sanitation, municipal utilities, rigging, pipe fitting, oil field maintenance, heavy construction, demolition, manufacturing, mining and fabrication.

 

Popular materials found in multi-purpose gloves include nylon, foam, terry cloth, silicone and TPR (Thermoplastic Rubber). Common features include multi-layer construction, adjustable wrist, insulated styles, thermal protection, high-visibility and silicone grip. Some gloves even build copper fibers into the fingertips to make them touch-screen friendly.

Balancing Durability and Flexibility Features

With so many styles and materials available, the options can be overwhelming. Especially when it comes to buying multi-purpose gloves, it’s important to consider how much strength and give you need in order to make the right choice. Start by deciding which feature is most important to you: durability or flexibility.

If durability is more important, narrow down your selection to top quality gloves with a basic exoskeleton, then search for features that provide added comfort like “breathable fourchettes”, “mesh padding” and “vented finger side panel”. If flexibility is more important, choose a non-exoskeleton style with added features like “palm and fingertips dipped”, “shell”, “coated” and “foam padding”.

Finding the Perfect Fit

Start by measuring the circumference of your dominant hand by pulling a body measuring tape around your palm, just above your thumb. Measure three times to make sure you have the correct calculation before you select your size.

Men’s sizing:

  • 7 in. (XS)
  • 5-8 in. (S)
  • 5-9 in. (M)
  • 5-10 in. (L)
  • 5-11 in. (XL)
  • 11+ in. (XXL)

Women’s sizing:

  • 6 in. (XS)
  • 5 in. (S)
  • 7 in. (M)
  • 5 in. (L)
  • 8 in. (XL)
  • 8+ in. (XXL)

If your gloves have adjustable wrist bands, make sure you pull them snug enough to prevent any material or debris from getting in, but loose enough that you don’t cut off circulation. If you can force one pinky finger between your wrist and the band, you’re good to go.

US Standard Products has a wide selection of top quality gloves that provide safer and smarter protection for Manual Labor and Civic Maintenance Professionals. Visit our website and download our free catalogue to start exploring your options. See all the other ways US Standard Products is making your world a better place by visiting us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.