The Must List: Manufacturing Safety

Fast-moving belts, metal-crushing machinery, and scraps potentially flying every which way. In the manufacturing world, safety hazards are plentiful, but fortunately, so is the safety equipment designed to provide protection from the dangers of the job. Here, we’ve compiled a comprehensive list of all the equipment your facility should have on hand in order to keep your workers safe, and your assembly line running smoothly and efficiently.

Fit-for-Purpose Gloves – There’s no one-size-fits-all glove. You have to do a little research to figure out which types of glove properties will be most beneficial for your specific need. For example, welders, or those who work with hot metal on the line, are going to want to get their hands on—or in—a pair heat resistant gloves. If someone is working with sharp objects, they are going to need gloves made with cut resistant materials. Learn more about selecting the right gloves for the job.

Spectacular Spectacles – You never know when something on the assembly line could go awry—and that’s precisely why it’s so important to always be prepared with safety glasses. Explore the options for different colored lenses to ensure the best visibility for the specific work environment.

Ear Protection – With so many moving parts, assembly lines are LOUD. Protect employees’ short- and long-term hearing by providing ear plugs or muffs and encouraging them to wear ear protection at all times.

Steel-Toed, Non-Slip Boots – No matter how graceful you may be, no one is immune to the potential of slipping and falling. In fact, falling is the #1 hazard in the workplace, according to OSHA. But, with employees wearing the right boots, you can help to eliminate that risk. And, with steel toes, you can be sure to protect feet from harm, should something heavy or sharp be dropped.

Bonus Tip: Repetitive Motion Stretch – Working on the line is hard work. It requires undivided focus, impeccable attention to detail, and a plethora of repetitive tasks. Keep your workers at the top of their game by providing guidance and opportunities for repetitive motion stretching. Here’s a great resource for eliminating physical stress often caused by assembly line work.

Shutting down the line due to an injury simply isn’t worth it. And at the end of the day, the safety of your employees is what matters most. With US Standard Products as your safety equipment partner, you can ensure that safety remains your top priority, and reap the benefits as they trickle down to your bottom line.

About US Standard Products

At US Standard Products’ core, we believe in keeping workers across all industries safe from the dangers of the job, and do so by providing the highest quality operational and safety products. To stay up-to-date on the latest workplace safety news and trends, follow US Standard Products on social media:

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Workplace Hearing Protection: What to Wear in Your Work Environment

Did you know that 30 million U.S. workers are exposed to hazardous noise levels in the workplace? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it’s estimated that nearly 125,000 of these workers have suffered significant, permanent hearing loss due to workplace exposure in the last 12 years.

Exposure to high decibel levels for extended periods of time can cause permanent damage to the ear, which in some cases can’t be corrected with surgery or hearing aids. Other symptoms of high noise exposure include a “stuffed-up” feeling in the ears and a constant ringing, called tinnitus.

To combat this ear damage, OSHA outlines strict requirements for hearing protection in the workplace. In fact, employers are legally required to provide hearing protection to all workers who are exposed to time-weighted average (TWA) sound levels at or above 85 dB for eight continuous hours per day. However, for workers who aren’t continually exposed to high decibel levels, it’s still crucial to wear protection whenever they’re exposed to noises above 85 dB.

Here, we’re taking a look at some of the noisiest industries to work in and providing suggestions on the best hearing protection solutions for each work environment.

Landscaping

Workers in the landscaping industry deal with a lot of noisy tools including lawn mowers, leaf blowers, tractors and more—all of which operate in the 90-100 dB range. Since many landscapers aren’t necessarily supervised on-the-job, or are actually the business owners themselves, it can be easy for them to “get away” with not wearing ear protection. This mindset can be very harmful. Even though the decibel level typically encountered in the landscaping industry is on the lower scale of the danger zone, continued unprotected exposure can lead to chronic hearing problems later in life.

Recommended hearing protection: Landscapers should wear hearing protection that’s most comfortable for them, whether that’s roll down foam earplugs, custom molded devices or a range of other options. As tempting as it may be to stick a pair of ear buds in and listen to music, that will only increase the decibel level and risk of permanent hearing damage.

Construction

Common noise culprits in the construction industry include bulldozers, chainsaws and jackhammers, which operate at 100-110 decibels. It’s critical for construction workers to wear ear protection on top of their regular safety gear when operating loud, heavy machinery.

Recommended hearing protection: Since communication is a key safety component of construction work, we recommend that workers wear noise-cancelling electronic earmuffs—a type of high-tech hearing protection that screens out only noises over 85 dB. Electronic earmuffs allow workers to easily hear lower-decibel sounds, like voices, while blocking out damaging higher noises. For jobs that are less reliant on loud machinery, simple foam earplugs on a cord may be more appropriate.

Emergency Responders + Military

A siren from an ambulance, police car or fire truck can reach up to 120 decibels, but it’s not practical, or necessarily safe, for emergency responders to wear ear protection while they’re driving to an urgent situation. Fortunately, most emergency vehicles are soundproofed, with the siren projected away from the vehicle to minimize the interior decibel level. It’s police officers and military personnel, when practicing shooting at the range, who really should be concerned about noise levels, as a gunshot ranges from 150 to 165 decibels.

Recommended hearing protection: Often, on a shooting range, gunshots happen frequently and unexpectedly. Noise-cancelling electronic earmuffs allow men and women who are practicing to comfortably communicate with others, while ensuring non-stop, reliable protection from the constant high decibel shots.

Ready to equip yourself or your employees with high quality workplace hearing protection? Contact U.S. Standard Products for more information about our available hearing protection products today. Give us a call at (844) 877-1700 or send us an email at info@usstandardproducts.com.

Resources

OSHA Occupational Noise Exposure

CDC Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention