Listen Up! 5 Guidelines to Protect Your Employees’ Hearing

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health estimates that about 22 million US employees are exposed to hazardous noise levels at work, making occupational hearing loss one of the most common work-related injuries in the country. With OSHA’s recommended “danger zone” starting at just 85 decibels, chances are that your industrial or construction workplace requires the use of hearing protection.

Common Sounds Measured in DecibelsSource: Chevy Chase ENT

1. Choose the Right Noise Reduction Rating

Having the gear doesn’t help if it isn’t the right quality. If crew members are using earplugs that don’t have the right noise reduction rating (NRR), hearing damage could still occur. Even though most hearing protection products come with a NRR on the packaging, you will still need to ensure your earplugs have the correct rating for the environment. If you’re not sure where to start, the CDC published a helpful guide to calculate and use the correct NRR for your work environment.

2. Keep Communication Lines Open

Protecting your hearing is good, but being able to communicate while working with proper protection in place can be challenging. To ensure clear lines of communication, despite the use of hearing protection, you might consider developing hand signals to help your employees get the message across. Another option is designating a place to step away from the noise and remove hearing protection safely. Digital earmuffs with radio capabilities are also a safe bet. These “walkie-talkie” earmuffs allow communication to continue without having to shut down machinery or move away from the work area.

3. Get Tested

OSHA standard 1910.95 requires employers to provide workers with annual hearing tests. While having an audiometric testing program is mandatory, the benefits of tracking employees’ hearing are worth the expense. Together, the baseline test and the annual test results allow employers to see if their hearing conservation efforts are working. If hearing loss is detected, employers can take follow-up measures to prevent further damage. For additional employer responsibilities, see OSHA’s hearing conservation guide.

4. Know When to Wear

As the old adage goes, knowing is half the battle. Educating employees about hearing protection and when it is necessary is the best way to strengthen your safety culture. Some key points to communicate include when and where to wear hearing protection, which protection to use in different situations, and the lasting damage that results from failing to use the proper protection.

5. Replace When Ready

Worn-out equipment should be thrown away. Following the manufacturer’s care instructions helps to keep the hearing protection working at their best. You’ll know that it’s time to replace earmuffs when the headband is no longer able to keep the muffs snugly against the head. To get the full benefit of the equipment, conduct regular inspections, checking that the earplugs and muffs are still flexible and safe to use.

Stock Up on Gear that Protects the Ears

At US Standard Products’ core, we believe in keeping workers across all industries safe from the dangers of the job, and do so by providing the highest quality operational and safety products. To stay up-to-date on the latest workplace safety news and trends, follow US Standard Products on social media:

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Staying Energized and Increasing Productivity on the Job

The ExxonMobil oil spill, Three Mile Island accident, Challenger Explosion, and Chernobyl were all disasters in their own right. They have each been studied extensively to isolate what caused them, and it’s been found there are many factors that worked together to cause these events to occur. What’s interesting is that one factor, in particular, was common among all of these crises—and it’s a factor that impacts every work site operating today: sleep deprivation.

Without the enough sleep, a worker becomes slower to react to hazards, sluggish in completing work, and more likely to make mistakes. These employees are up to 70 percent more likely to be involved in an accident while on the job. And although each individual is responsible for his or her own sleep schedule, it’s your company’s responsibility to ensure that workers remain safe on the job—whether that takes diligent observation, extra training, or regular drills and inspections. Now, especially with the dog days of winter upon us, you’re going to need more than personal protective equipment to maintain a safe, productive, and non-drowsy work site. Keep your workforce well rested, energized, and ultimately safer with our three tips for avoiding drowsy workplace disasters.

1. Stay Hydrated

More than a summertime problem, workers without enough fluids in their system become lethargic and irritable. They may not even recognize that they are dehydrated because the body’s thirst sensation decreases by about 40% in cold weather conditions. Not only does staying hydrated keep energy levels high during the day, thus increasing productivity, but it also promotes better sleep at night. A study published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS) found that as subjects increased their liquid intake, especially in the hours before going to bed, they were more positive, satisfied, and calm. Encourage your leadership to implement a wellness program that provides education about healthy sleeping and hydration habits.

2. Avoid Sugar

Another part of that wellness program could include education about healthy eating habits and the effects of eating sugar. Many people don’t know that the effects of a “sugar rush” will last only for a short time, usually just 30 minutes. Then, they crash, leaving them feeling even more sluggish than before. A zombie-like crew isn’t one you want working in any environment, especially an extreme one. If possible, provide more low-sugar snacks, such as trail mix, whole grain cereal bars, and fruit with peanut butter packs, in the vending machines and lunch areas.

3. Get Some Fresh Air

If your crew isn’t already working outside, allowing them to step out for a breath of fresh air on their breaks can be really invigorating. The increased oxygen and vitamin D are good for both short-term and long-term health, helping your crew to stay healthy and alert on the job. The fresh air helps to clear the lungs, which in turn increases oxygen intake and flow to vital regions of the body such as the brain and heart. It also strengthens white blood cells whose job it is to fight off disease. Increasing productivity and general workforce health, an outdoor break is worth the extra minute or two it might take.

Bonus Tip: Provide Top Quality Safety Gear

Even when at their best, the most energized, well-rested crews can still have accidents. Always ensure that your gear is up to par by replacing old and damaged safety gear regularly. US Standard Products, a nation-wide provider of quality operational and safety products, has the personal protection equipment that you need to keep your employees safe. Call 1-844-877-1700 today to learn how we can help you get the right equipment at the right price.

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When to Replace Safety Equipment

There might be more than calendars that need to be replaced in your workplace this January. As an industrial workplace employer, the safety of your workforce falls to you. Personal protective equipment (PPE) is considered the last line of defense for workplace safety. No matter the industry, knowing when to replace safety equipment minimizes failure of worn-out devices and resulting injuries. Here are some ways to know if it’s time to discard the old PPE and bring in some new gear.

Fall Arrest Systems

The number one workplace hazard is fall protection, so it should be at the top of your list when looking at what safety equipment needs replacing. The most important time to inspect a personal fall protection system is after it has been part of a fall event. OSHA guidelines state that these systems should be, “immediately removed from service and shall not be used again for employee protection unless inspected and determined by a competent person to be undamaged and suitable for reuse.”

OSHA-certified inspectors should inspect fall arrest systems yearly. Often, the equipment will have a suggested inspection date instead of an expiration date, as it is no longer required for manufacturers to incorporate one on the label. Any system that fails inspection, “must be withdrawn from service immediately, and should be tagged or marked as unusable, or destroyed,” per OSHA regulations.

Hard Hats

Without a mandated lifespan from OSHA or ANSI, it can be difficult to know when hard hats need replacing. Obviously, if there is visible damage on the exterior or interior, the hard hat needs to be removed from use. Many manufacturers recommend replacing hard hats every five years, regardless of outward appearance, and the interior suspension every 12 months.

A hard hat’s usability also depends on what sort of environment the user is working in. Extreme environments with elements such as increased heat, exposure to chemicals, or sunlight reduce the lifespan of hard hats, making them suitable for only approximately two years before needing replacement.

Shoe Safety

There is one piece of equipment that employees are almost sure to wear home: their shoes or boots. As an employer, the fact that work shoes are worn off-site makes it difficult to ensure that each worker’s footwear is up to snuff. So how do you make sure that what’s being worn complies OSHA and ANSI’s standards?

Regular shoe and boot inspections are a good start. Educating your employees on proper boot maintenance, care, and disposal is another way of ensuring proper protection. Some companies go as far as instituting shoe subsidy programs to encourage workers to replace footwear regularly. Since employees are sometimes responsible for providing their own safety gear, like boots, these subsidy programs ease or erase any potential financial burdens on workers that are associated with having new, appropriate shoes on hand.

Safety Gloves

Different jobs demand different kinds of protection—and that especially applies to hand protection. Once your employees have the right gloves for the job, you’ll also need to ensure that the gloves are in working order before each use.

Start by checking for tears, cuts, holes, or other defects before and after each task. Since gloves can get caught on tools and equipment easily, loose-fitting gloves and gloves with hanging strings should not be worn. Before starting any job, hands and gloves should be clean and dry, and for gloves that may have been contaminated, follow proper disposal procedures. Always keep extra gloves handy for when used ones need replacing.

Protection Provided by US Standard Products

Fully functional safety equipment is the key to keeping your workers well protected. US Standard Products, a nation-wide provider of quality operational and safety products, has the personal protection equipment that you need to keep your employees safe. Call 1-844-877-1700 today to learn how we can help equip your team with the gear necessary to meet OSHA standards.

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Food Safety at Holiday Parties

After you’ve finished decorating the office, you’re ready for the event of the year: the holiday party. This year-end celebration brings the team together for a fun morale boost full of festive drinks, treats, and cuisine. There are a number of ways you can handle the food aspect of your holiday party each with their own set of pros and cons. We’ve listed below some the considerations for a few of your options, as well as the safety precautions that will need to be addressed.


Probably the quickest and easiest option, hiring a caterer takes away a lot of the stress of party preparation.

But how can you be sure you’re hiring a caterer that will use food handling best practices? Reading reviews and asking for referrals are a great way to make sure that your caterer has a history of providing their services safely before you ever meet them. You can also check to see if they are licensed at local and state levels, which helps to ensure that they are certified in food safety and if they have any past violations. If your caterer ever becomes unresponsive, doesn’t have a clear cancellation process, or neglects to provide tastings, just be aware that you are taking a shot in the dark as to what you can expect from them on the big day.

You may also want to walk through the venue with them to make sure they have everything that they need. An experienced chef and staff will know better than anyone what to do to pull off the perfect party menu.


To be a little more hands-on, you could always choose to pick up pre-prepared appetizers from the local grocery store. Check that your selections are sealed and fresh. Be sure to keep hot things hot and cold things cold as you transport, serve, and store food to decrease the risk of bacterial growth. Before you set out your spread, wash your hands. Wearing food handling gloves is another way to prevent the spread of germs. If you decide to forego paper products, wash all dishes, cups, and utensils with hot and soapy water to get them squeaky clean for the party.

On-Site Cooking

Even though your co-workers may feel like a second family to you, the way you prepare food should be held to a different standard than how you might do so at home. On top of everything that was mentioned for a pre-prepared party, if you’re cooking on-site, you’ll want to clean your cooking area. Using paper towels and green cleaning products help to keep your cooking and eating areas clean while using fewer toxic chemicals. Make sure that these areas are completely dry before you start to cook or put any food items on them.

In this scenario, food-handling gloves should be worn not just for serving the food, but throughout the entire meal-making process. This includes changing your gloves at least once between the preparation and serving phases. You should change your food-handling gloves as frequently as necessary to avoid cross-contamination.

Microwaves can be used to cook food, just be sure that it’s heated evenly by stirring and rotating it often. Make sure that all food reaches a safe internal temperature with a cooking thermometer before serving it. There is no “close enough” in food safety.

Off-Site Cooking

Entering into an unfamiliar space makes it all the more important to follow safe food handling procedures. Knowing how big of a space you have to work with allows you to be sure that the cooking area isn’t overcrowded and food is safe from cross-contamination. You’ll also need to know what equipment is provided on-site and what you’ll need to bring with you. Since you can’t be sure what sanitation state the site will be in, leave extra time for set-up including a scrub down of the cooking area. It’s better to do a little extra cleaning up front, instead of not cleaning and wishing you had.

Party Now, Party Later

In any of these situations, there might be some leftovers. Refrigerate any leftover food as soon as possible; the longer food sits out, the more likely it will grow bacteria. If perishable food like meat, eggs, or casseroles are left out at room temperature for longer than two hours, don’t save it, discard it. If you don’t send the leftovers home with your party-goers, make sure there’s enough room in the company fridge to allow air to circulate, keeping it cool and ready to reheat on Monday.

Party with US Standard Products

No matter where your party food is made, employee safety should always be a top priority. US Standard Products, a nation-wide provider of quality operational and safety products, has the food handling gloves, green cleaning products, and other food safety equipment you need to throw a safe and happy holiday party. Contact us today at 844-877-1700 to learn how we can help you prepare for the holidays and holiday parties in the safest way possible.

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How to Decorate Your Office for the Holidays Safely

From hanging lights outside, to decorating around the department, the holiday spirit is likely to take over your office this season. While many large businesses opt to hire a professional decorating company, smaller organizations often choose to decorate themselves. Along with a fun and easy team-building activity, decorating your office yourself also means that the final product will have a more personal touch. As you and your co-workers deck the cubicle walls, keep in mind the following five safety tips.

1. Refrain from Decorating Safety Equipment

It may seem harmless to spruce up those safety fixtures you never seem to use like emergency lights or exit signs, but it’s best to leave them untouched. Not only could your decorations violate OSHA regulations, they might stop the systems from functioning properly. All alarms, detectors, sprinklers, extinguishers, and signs should be easily visible and accessible. Plus, you never know when those dusty lights might spring into action and be needed.

2. Stay Steady on Ladders

With ladders in OSHA’s top 10 workplace hazards, there’s never a bad time to review and practice ladder safety. Make sure ladders are tall enough so that you don’t have to stand on the top step or your tiptoes to complete the job. It might take a little longer, but it’s important to move the ladder often so that you are not leaning or off-balance. Have someone secure the bottom of the ladder so that it’s steady. This way, everyone gets to enjoy the season without any holiday hospital bills.

3. Leave Exits and Pathways Clear

You might get carried away with holiday cheer as you are decorating, but you don’t want to trip under the mistletoe, especially in the event of an emergency. Make sure to leave doorways and main walkways clear of larger items like Christmas trees, but also smaller ones to avoid any blockages, trips, or other workplace accidents. These might include trinkets such as gifts or ornaments that passersby might bump into accidentally. Leaving room for people to come and go allows for the fun to flow freely as you celebrate with holiday activities.

4. Secure all Wires and Cords

You wouldn’t choose for anyone to get tangled up in your decorations even if they are caught up in the joy of the holidays. To keep everyone safe and decorations where you placed them, fasten loose cords and wires to appropriate surfaces. Ensure that cables lie flat on all surfaces so that no one accidentally pulls them away from where they should be. Wrapping up an extra long cord also helps to make clean up easier, not that we’re anywhere near ready to be done with the festivities!

5. Fireproof your Decor

Keep that fire extinguisher on the shelf this year by making sure that all electronic elements are away from flammable items like curtains, chairs, or coats. Check wires to ensure that they are not fraying or worn thin. Make sure to turn off electronic decorations overnight to prevent them from overheating and potentially melting nearby or encasing plastic. Also use battery-powered candles instead of open flames to ensure that nothing but ice will be melting this holiday season.

As you decorate your office this winter, US Standard Products, a nationwide provider of quality operational and safety products, has the gear you need to do so safely. Contact us today at 844-877-1700 to learn how we can help you prepare for the holidays in the safest way possible.

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Exploring Safety Equipment for Extreme Environments

As a trade professional, you likely know the ins and outs of safety best practices—the importance of wearing the right gear and having the right protective equipment on hand has probably been drilled into your head since day one. But what about those times when you’re pushed out of your comfort zone? Literally. Throughout the course of your career, you’ll likely encounter extreme scenarios and environments that will call for extreme safety measures. Here we’ve outlined some of those common “extreme” environments and exactly what you’ll need to ensure maximum safety on the job.

Small, Enclosed Spaces

Whether you’re working in a multi-mile tunnel or a small crawlspace under a home, tight, enclosed spaces present a unique set of safety challenges—they’re often dark, have poor ventilation, and pose serious risk in the case of a fire, to name a few. Stay safe in this extreme environment by ensuring you always have a hard hat, safety glasses, protective footwear, a portable hand and/or cap lamp, and a self-rescuer on hand.


From conducting roofing work, to changing a light bulb, to washing windows on a skyscraper, heights are a common factor involved with many jobs. And while all jobs include some fall risk, when you’re working at extreme heights, a fall can lead serious injury, if not death. In additional to traditional PPE gear, the gear needed to work safely at extreme heights might include a harness, anchor, lanyard, deceleration device, and a mechanical prusik.

Extreme Heat or Cold

No matter the temperature, the work still has to get done. When working in extreme heat—whether outdoors or in a sweltering space such as an engine room on a ship, you’ll want to wear moisture-wicking fabrics and drink plenty of water. Here, we put together a guide for working safely in hot weather. In the cold, you’ll want to dress in layers and always wear an insulating hat to retain your body heat. Read more in our cold weather gear guide.

Unsanitary Environments

For some workers, such as waste collectors or sanitation crews, germs and general “yuck” are just part of the daily job. But across all lines of work, you may have to deal with unsanitary environments on occasion, and when that occurs, it’s crucial to have the right protective gear. When dealing with hazardous materials, there are different levels of protection required depending on the risk of exposure. In general, however, you should always wear protective eyewear, a hard hat, and chemical-resistant gloves and boots, and also have a respirator and full body suit on hand.

Order Your Extreme Environment Safety Gear Today

US Standard Products is a nationwide provider of quality operational and safety products. Contact us today at 844-877-1700 to learn how we can help equip you and your team with the proper gear needed to safely work in extreme environments.

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Your Business Flooded… Now What?

In the wake of two major hurricanes, countless businesses along our country’s southern coast are faced with the aftermath—in particular, water damage. We know that when it comes to your business operations, downtime equals lost revenue, so to help businesses get back up and running ASAP, we’ve compiled some steps to take in the event of a flood or other water damage.

First things first…

1. Assess the damage, take pictures, and call your insurance agent. Before all else, you have to get a handle on what happened, and document the damage. Be aware that even if flood water appears clear, it’s possible that it’s contaminated, so always wear protective boots and gloves whenever you’re in contact with water-damaged surfaces. Once you’ve analyzed your losses and taken pictures, call your insurance company and have them send an adjuster to conduct a formal assessment and get your claim started.

2. If you’re in a disaster area, call FEMA. In the case that your location has been officially declared a “disaster area”, contact the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to access resources and possible financial assistance.

3. Call in a pro. Water damage is tricky—if it’s not cleaned up properly, it can lead to the growth of dangerous mold and compromise the integrity of your building structure. Due to these complications, a majority of organizations opt to hire a professional restoration company for flood cleanup services.

4. Dry it out. If you have standing water in your facility, set up a pump immediately to begin the process of extracting the water. Next, you’ll want to set up industrial fans and dehumidifiers to completely dry out the space. Depending on how quickly a water damage restoration team can get there, they may handle this on your behalf.

Hiring a reputable emergency restoration crew.

Your insurance company will likely provide a recommendation for an emergency restoration company, but it’s important for you to do your homework before making a hiring decision. You’ll want to ensure that the restoration company you’re considering has the proper training, certifications, and safety procedures in place—the Better Business Bureau (BBB) is a good place to qualify credentials like that. You may also consider researching reviews to get an idea of what it’s like to work with the company before you make a commitment.

Cleaning up water damage yourself.

Whether you’re trying to cut costs or simply having a hard time finding a restoration company that will meet your needs, you may choose to handle the cleanup in-house. If this is the case, be sure that you have the right safety gear on hand. When demolishing walls, floors, and more, it’s critical that you use a respirator to protect your lungs from not only dust, but also water contaminants and potential mold spores. Again, always make sure to use heavy-duty gloves when handling any water-damaged materials. Similarly, you’ll need an extensive supply of industrial strength cleaning agents that can cut through the bacteria, and kill mold at the source.

Contact US Standard Products for water damage cleanup supplies today.

US Standard Products is a nationwide provider of quality operational and safety products. Contact us today at 844-877-1700 to learn how we can best equip your business with the safety equipment and cleaning products needed for your water damage restoration efforts.

To stay up-to-date on the latest workplace safety news and trends, follow US Standard Products on social media:

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US Standard Products Insights: You Can’t Automate Safety

It’s not news to anyone that the manufacturing industry is facing a massive shift. Between artificial intelligence, automation, and other advanced technologies, manufacturing is quickly becoming a more tech-focused and “hands-off” line of work. In 2014, there were 1.5 million industrial robots in factories and warehouses, and that number only continues to climb.

However, as more and more tasks are handed over to the “bots”, one thing must not be swept up in the flurry of technological advancement: workplace safety. Sure there’s a lot of technology that empowers enhanced safety, but in reality it’s the people behind the machinery that drive a successful safety culture. As you and your team work side-by-side with newer, smarter machines, don’t forget these key points:

Technology can make mistakes, too.

No one’s perfect—and that includes that robotic arm working on the line. It’s critical for manufacturing workers to be aware that malfunctions will happen, and they can be dangerous. Preventative analytics technology and regularly-scheduled maintenance can help prevent glitches, breakdowns, and other problems from occurring and putting your workers in harm’s way.

The human mind is irreplaceable.

Though artificial intelligence has come a long way, especially in recent years, it’s certainly no replacement for the human elements of the job—things such as spur-of-the-moment problem solving, attention to detail, and even simply common sense. If you’re working with more automated elements, you still have to bring your “A” game—always be aware of your surroundings, report any red flags, and ensure you’re equipped with the proper training and gear to keep you safe on the job.

A safe and healthy workplace extends beyond the areas in which automation is involved.

OSHA identifies slips, trips, and falls as the most frequent workplace and safety violation. You can’t put the blame on artificial intelligence for that one. It’s critical to ensure your entire environment—not just areas in which heavy machinery is being used—is free from hazards. Plus, it’s important to take a holistic look at what makes up a safe and healthy environment. Things like using green cleaning products, implementing a wellness program, and providing top-notch PPE equipment can go a long way in ensuring a safe workspace, as well as a healthy workforce.

Stay Safe Alongside Technology with US Standard Products

With all this change in the industry, one thing remains the same: safety trumps all. To ensure your team is equipped with all the proper safety gear for the job, contact US Standard Products, a nationwide provider of some of the highest quality operational and safety products. To stay up-to-date on the latest workplace safety news and trends, follow US Standard Products on social media:

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All Aboard: Nautical Safety Checklist

When it comes to keeping your crew safe out on the deep blue sea, having life preservers, emergency rafts, and other floatation devices readily available is a no brainer. You’re prepared for the worst, and that’s a great start—but your ship safety precautions shouldn’t stop there. Ensuring a safe work environment is critical, both on land and sea. Do you have the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) on hand to keep your workers safe through the day-to-day rigors of working aboard the ship? We’ve put together a quick checklist to help you find out.

Non-Slip, Steel-Toed Boots – Wet, metal walkways—as often found on ship decks—are the perfect recipe for slips, trips, and falls. To ensure maximum safety on deck, it’s crucial for all workers to be equipped with boots designed to enhance traction on slippery surfaces.

Ear Plugs or Muffs – Ship engines can produce upwards of 110-120 db of sound—about as loud as a jet plane taking off—which makes engine rooms and other mechanical areas dangerously loud for human ears. Ear plugs or ear muffs should always be on hand to protect workers’ ears from the noise of the ship.

Glasses, Gloves, and Hard Hats – For work that requires any sort of manual labor, it’s important to make sure all workers are wearing safety glasses, protective gloves, and well-fitting hard hats. They’re classic PPE items, but they’re common practice for a reason—to keep workers safe.

Role-Specific Gear – Depending on the size and the type of ship, there might be specialized workers on board, such as welders, window washers, waste management staff, chefs, and a wide range of other roles. Each of these workers should be equipped with proper safety gear (i.e. welding shields, harnesses, chemical-resistant suits, cut-protection gloves, etc.) to protect them from the hazards they might face within their role.

Whether you’re looking to ramp up your on-board safety efforts, or are just looking to restock your arsenal of safety equipment, US Standard Products has what you’re looking for. Call us toll-free today at 844-877-1700 to learn more.

About US Standard Products

At US Standard Products’ core, we believe in keeping workers—both on the water and off—safe from the dangers of the job, and do so by providing the highest quality operational and safety products. To stay up-to-date on the latest workplace safety news and trends, follow US Standard Products on social media:

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How to Ensure Your Workers Stay Safe While Operating Machinery

More than 4,500 fatal injuries occur in the workplace per year. Prevention is key; know your employees are in the safest possible environment when it comes to preventing future machinery mishaps on the job. In this blog, we have compiled some ways to keep your workers safe, including being up-to-date with the lockout/tagout (LOTO) process, knowing what safety gear to have on hand, and understanding what extra precautions to take while operating machinery.

Revisit Your LOTO Procedure Frequently

In 2016, the lock out tag out procedure was specified as one of OSHA’s top 5 workplace hazards. Training workers the steps that are involved in the lockout/tagout procedure is crucial in order to ensure worker safety. To make sure employees both understand and follow the lockout/tagout program include:

  • Conducting weekly, annual, and random inspections. This keeps a routine in place and the constant reminder to keep using the lockout/tagout procedure.
  • Providing quick and easy access to LOTO kits. Lockout/tagout is a procedure that includes locks and tags to warn workers that there is something wrong with a machine or equipment; should not be used until the machine or equipment has been fixed and unlocked or untagged. Having quick and easy access to LOTO kits can make the procedure more efficient.
  • Providing colored tags in lock out tag out kit. Color-coding tags is not required by OSHA but it is a quick and easy way to differentiate warnings and dangers.
  • Encouraging communication between co-workers. It is best to have everyone on the same page; communication is one of the main components to keeping workers safe. Reassuring your workers to have conversations about safety daily can have a positive effect for your employees.

Have the Right Safety Gear on Hand

When it comes to machine safety, you never know what is going to happen on the job. Being prepared with the right safety gear is important regarding safety. Here is a list of essential personal protective equipment to ensure the best protection for your workers as they operate machinery.

  • Protective eyewear
  • Cut-and impact-resistant gloves
  • Steel-toed boots
  • Ear muffs or plugs

Take Extra Safety Precautions

When it comes to working in dangerous conditions, there is no such thing as being too prepared or safe; safety is key. Here are some ways to make sure your workers are getting the best protection:

  • Provide protective safety gear to all workers
  • Have a first aid kit available in case of minor injuries
  • Have machines thoroughly checked before restarting a machine/equipment
  • All employees should stay approximately 30ft away from the machine or equipment that is being worked on or restarted
  • Make sure everyone on site knows the company’s emergency plan

Awareness of potential hazards—from machine malfunctions to slips, trips and falls—helps reduce future injuries and accidents, which can help save lives. Here at US Standard Products, we have what you need to keep your workers safe and protected. Check out our product catalog for quality, affordable safety gear.